155 – Goat Lake

Backpacking back into the Goat Rocks Wilderness to set up camp in the Jordan Basin the day after fleeing for a night to dry out in the town of Packwood, WA (go here –https://60before60.wordpress.com/2013/09/07/59-backpacking-goat-rocks-wilderness-berry-patch-to-jordan-basin/  – to read about that), we awoke to sunny skies. Mother earth had managed to absorb a majority of the four to six inches of precipitation that had caused such quick flooding along the streams and trails just days before making it a great day for us to continue hiking along the Goat Ridge Trail ( http://www.nwhiker.com/GPNFHike14.html ) and on to Goat Lake.

Climbing talus slopes

Kenton Doughty climbing talus slopes to Goat Lake

The views were spectacular! Here’s the now flat topped Mount Saint Helens from our trail.

Mount Saint Helens . . . from the trail

Mount Saint Helens . . . from the trail

And the mighty Mount Adams. Beautiful!

Mount Adams

Mount Adams

It was hard to believe that we had been rained out just days before as it was such a beautiful day to be out on the trail. It felt like we were basking in sunshine!

Along the trail to Goat Lake

Along the trail to Goat Lake

Continuing to gain elevation as we worked our way up the rocky trail, we finally reached Goat Lake. Well above the tree line and surrounded with nothing but walls of rock, mounds of ice still floated in the lake

Goat Lake

Goat Lake

Hoping to see goats while hiking in the Goat Rocks Wilderness, to my delight, high up on a grassy ledge above the lake, we observed this herd.

Goats grazing above Goat Lake

Goats grazing above Goat Lake

Go here – http://www.everytrail.com/destination/goat-rocks-wilderness – for directions and information about hiking in the Goat Rocks Wilderness.

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154 – Backpacking Goat Rocks Wilderness – Berry Patch to Jordan Basin

Who heads back into the wilderness a day after being chased out by severe rain, hail and flooding (see Hike #58 – Rain, Hail, Floods – the Packwood Dryout)? We do! Here we are, at the trailhead for the Goat Ridge Trail, ready to hike back into the Goat Rocks Wilderness.

Goat Ridge Trail to Jordan Creek

Goat Ridge Trail to Jordan Creek

Having originally planned this backpacking trip along a series of trails that made up a loop through a portion of the Goat Rocks Wilderness, because we had lost a day as we attempted to wait out the storm, then evacuated to the town of Packwood to dry out, we began this hike where our loop hike would have ended – in the area known as Berry Patch. By hiking in from our original ending point in the oposite direction, we figured we would salvage as much hiking and exploration time in the Goat Rocks Wilderness area as possible without having to repeat the miles of hiking we had already completed those first couple of days in and out of Snowgrass Flats, Cispus Basin and Cispus Pass. Here, Kent Doughty, registers for our new backcountry camping permit.

Registering for permit to camp

Registering for permit to camp

Even though there were still a few remaining clouds from that storm front that just passed through the area, right from the start of our hike, the views from the trail were stunning.

View from the trail

View from the trail

Although only a difference of something like 1,400′ or so gain in elevation between the trailhead and where we were planning to camp, this trail, like so many we follow, consisted of what felt like just about as many up hill gains as down. Up and down, up and down is how the trail worked its way around the mountain. This particular spot felt plenty steep to me – especially when loaded down with a heavy backpack.

It's a long, steep trail

It’s a long, steep trail

The next turn took us back down – then before we knew it, back up again. Yep, up and down, up and down, up and down, that’s how it was.

More Up than Down . . . along the trail

More Up than Down . . . along the trail

All the while, I couldn’t help but enjoy the view.

View along the trail

View along the trail

Finally, we reached the Jordan Creek Basin and found a lovely area off the main trail in which to set up camp.

Setting up Camp in Jordan Basin

Setting up Camp in Jordan Basin

Just look at the incredible view we had as we sat on a big rock overlooking the valley below and ate our dinner. The perfect way to relax after a long day of hiking!

Evening view from camp

Evening view from camp

Our backpacking dinners this year have gotten so much better – and healthier.  With a severe allergy to capsicum, it is difficult (if not impossible!) for me to simply grab one of those pre-packaged, instant backpacking meals off the shelf at REI, or similar store, so we took a class this year at our local REI on backcountry cooking. While most of the foods and recipes they demonstrated weren’t quite for us, we walked out of that class with lots of inspiration to be more creative. Last year, I felt that our meals lacked enough vegetables, and I grew so tired of tuna in a foil pack. This year, we have pulled out our dehydrator and dry our own foods. I felt lucky when we found a vegetable soup stock in the bulk foods section of our local Winco that did not contain pepper, and by adding dried lentils, beans and lots of our own dehydrated vegetables, I’d say that this vegetable soup was the very best dinner ever on the trail. So good in fact, that I’m seriously considering making up a big pot of it for home!

Best backpacking dinner ever!

Best backpacking dinner ever!

Go here – Backpacking Goat Rocks Wilderness – to read more about our backpacking trip into the Goat Rocks Wilderness. Happy Trails!

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153 – Backpacking Goat Rocks Wilderness – Rain, Hail, Floods – The Packwood Dryout

Checking the weather forecast as we gathered our camping gear and filled our backpacks before leaving home, we knew rain was inevitable. We embraced the first snow of the season last year when we backpacked the Heather-Maple Pass Loop – Hike #76 – Heather Pass – Setting Up Camp. We did not let a day of steady rain dampen our spirits earlier this year as we backpacked along the Chelan Lakeshore Trail on our way to Stehekin – Hike #44 – Moore Point to Flick Creek. We’ve hiked and camped in adverse conditions before . . . many times – check it out!

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We have good rain gear. Kent’s a cyclist and bikes over twenty miles every morning to work – rain or shine. We live in the Pacific Northwest. We are accustomed to fast changing weather conditions. We are rarely scared off by bad weather. Of course we decided not to cancel this trip just because a storm was on its way. But then it started to rain. It rained hard. Followed by near constant thunder. Ricoching pellets of hail the size of moth balls pounded us from every direction. Not even under our rainfly were we safe from those stinging pellets of hail – they bounced everywhere.

Moth ball sized hail

Moth ball sized hail

Eventually the hail stopped, but the rain continued. The area where we had set up our tent soon became a river of rain. Kent picked up a log and dug trenches around our tent in hopes of keeping the water from flowing under the tent so the floor (and sleeping bags!) would stay dry.

Trenching the flooding camp

Trenching the flooding camp

As the evening progressed, our camp continued to flood. We debated about packing up the bare essentials (sleeping bags, food for breakfast & morning coffee, and our emergency medical kit), donning our headlamps and hiking down to the trailhead to sleep in the car. Discovering that what had been a trail was now a rapidly running stream and what had been a mere creek was now a raging flash flood, we scouted around Snowgrass Flats to survey the conditions. It became very apparent that it would not be safe to hike out that night. Our only option that night was to wait the storm out, and then see what conditions we would be faced with in the morning.

Flooding . . .

Flooding . . .

We had spotted one lone tent set up in the middle of a field on the other side of Snowgrass Flats when we had originally hiked in, and, hoping their camp was fairing better than ours, we sloshed over and introduced ourselves. Turned out, our neighboring camper was nature, wilderness, landscape photographer Dick Balnicky, and his loveable golden retriever. His tent sat in the middle of a meadow, and It seemed, he was not fairing any better than us. He had hiked out to resupply in the nearby town of Packwood just the day before, and told us that this storm was expected to dump at least four to six inches of precipitation. Since hiking out that evening was no longer an option, we discussed moving our tent to a more protected location. Dick made the slog with us through the storm to our camp, and helped Kent pick our tent up. Together they moved it from where it sat with a stream of water running under it to a nearby location on dryer ground between a couple of small trees.

Moved Tent Under Trees

Moved Tent Under Trees

Though relatively dry underneath, all night long, the tent rattled from the thunder and was pounded by heavy rains. Surprisingly though, it was only a little damp around the edges by morning, and as the day progressed to noon, we continued to wait out the storm.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Wet at camp

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Wet at camp

After lunch, we decided to take another walk around the area to survey the damage from the storm, and everything was flooded, flooding, wet, soaked, soggy, saturated, very wet – and the rain continued.

Flooding

Flooding

Some of the logs in that makeshift bridge that we had used to cross the stream coming into Snowgrass Flats had washed away. The water level had risen so high in that creek and it was flowing so fast, we knew it would not be safe to wade across.

Log bridge washed out

Log bridge washed out

We recalled having spied a fallen tree further up stream when we hiked in. It looked to be a bigger log than those that made up the make-shift bridge that we had crossed coming in. Protected by larger brush, we hoped it was still in place as we worked our way in that direction to check it out. Although the water level had risen and was now much closer to that tree, it appeared stable. And just like that, we declared it to be our new bridge!

The new stream crosing

The new stream crosing

We decided to pack up our soggy camp, hike back down to the trailhead and head to Packwood to wait the storm out. As it turned out, our neighboring camper, the photographer, had made that same decision – as had a few others. These elk hunters caught up with us along the trail on their way out. They had been hunting on the other side of Cispus Pass when they came to a huge washout along the trail. Adding many miles to their route, their only option was to hike out in the same direction as us. Having hiked to Cispus Pass (see Hike #57 – Pacific Crest Trail – Cispus Basin to Cispus Pass) the day before the rain had started, I couldn’t imagine what it must have been like for them to get their pack horses around the narrow trail through Cispus Basin – especially along the stretch where a waterfall flowed over the trail. They said the water was shooting over them so profusely that it was all they could do to lead each horse – one at a time – to the other side. It was a long, narrow stretch of trail, cut along a steep slope, one wrong step would have been all it would haven taken, and down they would have fallen – down, down, down. With many more miles to go, they’d had quite a day already by the time they reached us.

Elk Hunters with pack horses retreating

Elk Hunters with pack horses retreating

It was a wet few hours of hiking for us, no doubt about that.

A wet day of hiking

A wet day of hiking

Remember this bridge? It appeared such a gentle little stream when we hiked in two days before. In the storm, the water had risen to such a level that the vegetation along its shore was pounded and ragged. As we hiked out, we discovered many other areas where the trail had been in very good repair as we hiked in, but now were completely washed out. Often we found ourselves wading through water much deeper that our boots were high, and there was nothing we could do to keep our feet dry. That’s Balnicky’s dog in this photo by that fast flowing creek, wet as all get out. The dog didn’t mind the rain at all, and often ran ahead of its master to give us encouragement as we continued through the pouring rain.

The photographer's dog loves us

The photographer’s dog loves us

By the time we reached the trailhead, we had learned from other hikers along our soggy way that the gravel logging road we had driven in on had also been washed out by the storm. We ended up having to take a 35 (plus) mile detour in order to get to the town of Packwood. Through the constant drizzle, that extra hour or so of driving time seemed to last forever. We finally reached Packwood, changed into dry clothing and set up camp in a hotel. Dick invited us to join him for dinner at his favorite local restaurant later that evening. His photography is amazing – and inspiring to an amateur like myself (go here – Dick Balnicky, Photo.net Photos –  to see a sampling of his images). He is a nice man and I like that we made a new friend during the storm. He checked in with us as we were having breakfast the next morning. The rains had finally let up and our gear was about dry, and we told him that we would be hiking back into the Goat Rocks Wilderness later that morning. He was heading on to Yakima. I hope our paths cross again some day.

Drying out in Packwood

Drying out in Packwood

I found Packwood to be a charmingly vibrant little town. If you ever find yourself in the vacinity of Packwood, (even if you don’t need a place to dry out!), I highly recommend stopping in. For information on the town, go here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packwood,_Washington.

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152 – Pacific Crest Trail – Cispus Basin to Cispus Pass

I feel a sense of admiration for thru hikers each time we intersect with and/or follow a portion of the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) when we are out hiking. They travel the entire length of the PCT, all the way from the California-Mexico border, head north through the states of California and Oregon, and on through Washington until they reach the Canadian border. The PCT is well over 2,600 miles in length and takes about five months for the hikers to complete. Plus, I am sure, months of planning before they even get started. It must feel like such a huge accomplishment when they finish. At times I find myself even dreaming of a day when we might make that same journey. While thru hiking the PCT has not yet become a real goal, I do thoroughly enjoy each and every time our hikes take us along any intersecting snippets of the PCT.

Pacific Crest Trail . . .

Pacific Crest Trail . . .

Our backpacking trip into the Goat Rocks Wilderness in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest (go here – https://60before60.wordpress.com/2013/09/04/56-backpacking-goat-rocks-wilderness-snowgrass-flats/ – to read more about that backpacking trip) turned out to be one of those wonderful opportunities for us to follow a portion of the Pacific Crest Trail. Having set up camp at Snowgrass Flats the day before, we followed a short trail that connected us with the PCT, and we had a beautiful hike around the Cispus Basin and on up to Cispus Pass.

PCT . . . heading to Cispus Basin

PCT . . . heading to Cispus Basin

Here I am, along the PCT trail as it enters the Cispus Basin.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose along PCT through Cispus Basin

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose along PCT through Cispus Basin

And here I am taking a break on a boulder at the headwaters of the Cispus River.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose at headwaters of Cispus River in Cispus Basin

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose at headwaters of Cispus River in Cispus Basin

We stopped for a picnic lunch in a meadow filled with wildflowers at the headwaters of the Cispus River, then continued our trek around the Cispus Basin and on up to Cispus Pass.

Cispus Pass

Cispus Pass

At 6,473′ elevation, we had to climb a fair number of switchbacks in order to reach the pass. But once there, oh what a view! You can see the PCT from the pass as it continues on to Nanni Ridge.

PCT Cispus Pass to Nanni Ridge

PCT Cispus Pass to Nanni Ridge

Once we reached the pass, we turned around and followed the trail back around the Cispus Basin, a lovely display of clouds were rolling throughout the valley below. Was this the beginning of the predicted storm? Yes! With nearly twenty-four hours of heavy precipitation, including hours of moth-ball sized hail and flash flooding, stay tuned – expect to read more about that later!

PCT Cispus Pass to Cispus Basin

PCT Cispus Pass to Cispus Basin

We saw mountain goats on the other side of the Cispus basin as we worked our way back to camp.

A Goat . . . in Goat Rocks Wilderness

A Goat . . . in Goat Rocks Wilderness

For information on the Pacifit Crest Trail, go here – http://www.pcta.org/. Information about the hike through Cispus Basin and on to Cispus Pass can be found here – http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/cispus-basin-cispus-pass. Happy trails to you!

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151 – Backpacking Goat Rocks Wilderness – Snowgrass Flats

It seemed that we had been looking forward to our Goat Rocks Wilderness trip all summer long, and finally (finally!) our September vacation time was upon us. Limited only to what we could carry in our backpacks, packing for a week long trip deep into the wilderness takes a little more planning than for a one or two night trip. Weighing in at 70 and 35 pounds a piece, it’s pretty obvious here that the bigger one is Kent’s. He carries all the gear – the tent, tarps, ropes, stove, fuel, food (lots of food for a week long trip I might add!) cook pans and so much more. Me, well, there is just no way that I could carry a pack with all that in it, but I do manage to carry all my own personal gear – like two to three liters of water in my hydration unit and my clothes, sleeping bag, air mattress, camera gear and such.

Loaded and Ready to Roll

Loaded and Ready to Roll

The drive from home to the Snowgrass Flats trailhead in the Goat Rocks Wilderness took about 4-1/2 hours, and we ate lunch at the car before booting up. Having recently upgraded the old Volvo wagon for this higher clearance Subaru Forester, it did seem easier to make the drive up the gravel logging road in order to reach our trail.

Arriving at Trail

Arriving at Trail

Here we are at the Snowgrass Trailhead, well fed, booted up, packs on – and ready to head into the wilderness.

Snowgrass Flats Trailhead

Snowgrass Flats Trailhead

All along our hike from the trailhead to Snowgrass Flats, the trail was in very good repair. A close look at this photo shows how the trail over this stream has been previously washed out and built back up again. As it turned out, unfortunately, two days later, flash floods wiped out all that solid-looking construction and we found ourselves wading through a very fast flowing stream with water well over the tops of our boots in order to make the hike out. Stay tuned, you can read more about that in a future post!

Stream Crossing

Stream Crossing

Even with the clouds of a coming storm sometimes looming above us as we hiked, we had a wonderful view of Mount Adams from the trail.

Mount Adams . . . from the trail

Mount Adams . . . from the trail

Here’s Kent, making the final stream crossing into Snowgrass Flats. Since the logs of this make-shift bridge were wobbly, he first took his pack over, came back for mine, and then gave me a hand as I crossed. This bridge was wiped out too in the flash flood a couple of days after we made this crossing, but more about that later!

Stream crossing to Snowgrass Flats

Stream crossing to Snowgrass Flats

After a few hours on the trail with our heavy backpacks, it always feels good to be setting up camp.

Setting up Camp

Setting up Camp

Go here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goat_Rocks_Wilderness – for more information about the Goat Rocks Wilderness.

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150 – Ptarmigan Ridge

This was truly a bonus hike! We wanted to hike to Ptarmigan Ridge last year, but snows came early, then melted away, and our schedules allowed us but one more day of high country hiking. We chose to hike to Lake Ann that day (go here – Hike #83 – Lake Ann – to read about that hike). That was a lovely hike, and I certainly have no regrets about having spent the day along the trail to Lake Ann. But, as we were getting back into our car at the trailhead at the very end of our hike that day, one of Kent’s old friends drove by and stopped to chat once he recognized us. He shared that he had just finished the Ptarmigan Ridge hike and how beautiful that hike had been. Snow returned the following week and continued on for the season, making the Ptarmigan Ridge hike impossible – until late this season. Our day started off with gorgeous weather, and even though we were in the middle of prepping for a six-day, five-night backpacking trip deep into the Goat Rocks Wilderness and would be leaving in two days, we decided at almost the last minute that this would be the day we hiked to Ptarmigan Ridge. Laughing, we called this our “warm up hike”. Ten and a half miles later, we were still laughing!

Ptarmigan Ridge trailhead

Ptarmigan Ridge trailhead

This must be one of the most scenic hikes up in the Mount Baker area. Starting at the Artist Point parking lot, the trail is shared with two other very popular hikes – the hike to Table Mountain and the Chain Lakes loop hike. We enjoyed a beautiful hike along the Chain Lakes Loop Trail last year. Go here – Hike #74 – Chain lakes Loop – to check that out. Because the hike to Ptarmigan Ridge is more difficult than the other hikes due to its being longer, having more elevation gain and sometimes lingering snow causes white-out conditions on the ridge, by the time we had passed where those trails turn off, most of the other hikers were gone. The views were incredible. That’s Mount Shuksan as the backdrop in this photo that Kent snapped of me along the trail.

(pic by Kent Doughty) Along the Ptarmigan Trail

(pic by Kent Doughty) Along the Ptarmigan Trail

Millions of years of volcanic action and receeding glaciers have made the geology of this area quite interesting. It’s easy to understand how this pile of rock ended up here.

Explaning how this land was formed

Kent Doughty explans how this land was formed

We love snow fields along our trails as this near heart-shaped snow field confirms.

We love snow fields

We love snow fields

Cairns piled high along the trail bring the attention of passers by to special areas offering stunning views.

(pic by Kent Doughty) Along the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail

(pic by Kent Doughty) Along the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail

Often along the trail, the wildflowers were at their beautiful prime.

(pic by Kent Doughty) Wildflowers along the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail

(pic by Kent Doughty) Wildflowers along the Ptarmigan Ridge Trail

From this point along the trail, there were only a few more snow fields to pass, a little more elevation to gain, and a mile or so more before we reached Ptarmigan Ridge. I put on my ice trekkers and pulled out my trekking pole to make my going easier.

(pic by Kent Doughty) Rose crossing snow field on the way to Ptarmigan Ridge

(pic by Kent Doughty) Rose crossing snow field on the way to Ptarmigan Ridge

We brought along ice axes hoping for a chance to practice using them and had a great time playing in the snow.

Ice ax lessons . . .

Kent Doughty demonstrates using the Ice ax . . .

Here’s a shot of Mount Baker as viewed from Ptarmigan Ridge!

Mount Baker from Ptarmigan Ridge

Mount Baker from Ptarmigan Ridge

Carefully placed among the rocks on Ptarmigan Ridge now sits this tribute memorial. Dear Nina, though your days here were short, your memory lives on – and your view from this vantage point goes on for almost ever.

We love you, Nina . . . memorial placed on Ptarmigan Ridge

We love you, Nina . . . memorial placed on Ptarmigan Ridge

We took a break once we reached Ptarmigan Ridge and enjoyed the picnic we had packed in – and the beautiful views before turning around to make the hike back to Artist Point.

Back to the parking lot

Kent Doughty heads back to Artist Point

Visit the Washington Trails Association website, here – http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/ptarmigan-ridge – for more information, recent trip reports and directions for the hike to Ptarmigan Ridge.

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149 – Lake Twenty-Two

I am not sure why, but the hike to Lake Twenty-Two had been on my list for quite some time. Maybe because a number seems like an odd name for lake to me. Why name a lake a number? Where is Lake Twenty-One, Lake Seven, etc., who names these lakes anyway? It certainly is a beautiful lake though, and the hike there is absolutely outstanding. Now we have “been there, done that,” and loved it!

Lake Twenty-Two Trailhead

Lake Twenty-Two Trailhead

The beauty of the lake seems to be the big draw, but don’t forget to take note of the impressive forest most of the hike climbs through. There are more than many respectfully large trees to appreciate of along the trail.

Through a forest of BIG trees . . .

Through a forest of BIG trees . . .

And the views from the trail, equally impressive!

View from the trail . . .

View from the trail . . .

With boardwalk and trail running around the lake, we could easily explore the entire area. Snow still lingered at the far end, but not so deep that we could not find the trail again.

Lake Twenty-Two . . .

Lake Twenty-Two . . .

Packing in fishing gear, Kent tried his luck.

Fishing at Lake Twenty Two

Fishing at Lake Twenty Two

On the hike out, we had a good reminder of the importance of always carrying the ten essentials when hiking. Having drained our hydration units during the hike up to the lake, we stopped at a stream to purify water for a refill. Kent climbed a few feet off the trail, slightly up the stream bank, and pulled the water purifier out of his pack. Still close enough to easily carry on a conversation as he filtered the water, he turned his head to look at me as he spoke, and tumbled bac -, heels over head. Landing head first on a rock in a pool of water along side the trail, no serious injury was sustained; but, good thing we carried a first aid kit in our packs!

The price of clean water . . . heels over head

The price of clean water . . . heels over head

There is easy access to the Lake Twenty-Two trailhead from the Mountain Loop Highway. For driving directions and more information on this hike, visit the Washington Trails Association website, here – WTA, Lake Twenty-Two.

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148 – Cutthroat Pass

This was one of those great hikes with exceptional views! Having backpacked into Cutthroat Lake to camp along Cutthroat Creek the evening before (go here – https://60before60.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/52-backpacking-cutthroat-lake/ – to read about that hike), stellar blue skies made the conditions absolutely perfect for a hike up to Cutthroat Pass.

The View Along the Trail to Cutthroat Pass

The View Along the Trail to Cutthroat Pass

The hike from where we camped to the pass was about five miles in length with an elevation gain of approximately 2,000′. There were lots of familiar peaks to view along the way and the trail was very well maintained.

Look at that View!

Look at that View!

Rock formations often lined the trail as we climbed in elevation.

(pic by Kent Doughty) Along the trail to Cutthroat Pass

(pic by Kent Doughty) Along the trail to Cutthroat Pass

Here is a great view of Cutthroat Peak and Cutthroat Pass, our destination, (to the right of the peak) from the trail. Seeing the pass up ahead provided great motivation for us to keep on trekking!

Cutthroat Peak . . . from the trail

Cutthroat Peak . . . from the trail

There were snow fields at the pass, but they were easy to cross. This is where the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) joins the trail we had followed to reach Cutthroat Pass. Our trail ended there, and the Pacific Crest Trail continued on over the pass. Often when we are out hiking, we intersect with the PCT, and I can certainly see why some say that some of the most scenic sections of the PCT are said to be right here in Washington State. For more information on the PCT, go here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Crest_Trail. Wouldn’t the PCT be a marvelous through-hike to make some day?

Cutthroat Pass - Where Pacific Crest Trail joins

Cutthroat Pass – Where Pacific Crest Trail joins

Enjoying the spectacular 360 degree view, we explored all around the pass, then pulled out our picnic lunch in order to refuel before making the hike back down to our camp.

(pic by Kent Doughty) Relaxing . . . on Cutthroat Pass

(pic by Kent Doughty) Relaxing . . . on Cutthroat Pass

For information about hiking to Cutthroat Pass, visit the Washington Trails Association website, here – http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/cutthroat-pass-1.

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147 – Backpacking – Cutthroat Lake

On our way back from an afternoon business meeting in Twisp, we came prepared to backpack in to Cutthroat Lake for the night rather than make the long drive all the way back to Bellingham. Here we are at the trailhead ready to begin the hike.

Cutthroat Lake Trailhead

Cutthroat Lake Trailhead

This was an easy trail with very little elevation gain. At less than two miles from the trailhead to the lake, this made the perfect hike for us since we had not even reached the trailhead until around 5:00 p.m.

Through the Forest

Through the Forest

There always seems to be a stream crossing (or two!) along our wilderness hikes, and this trip was no exception. Here I am, ready to cross a log bridge over Cutthroat Creek.

(pic by Kent Doughty) My turn to cross the stream

(pic by Kent Doughty) My turn to cross the stream

Camping is not allowed along the shore of the lake, so we found this wonderful campsite right above Cutthroat Creek. The roar of the creek below was music to my ears as I drifted off to sleep that night. The bugs were bad, but we came prepared with our bug nets, and were extra carefull not to allow any of those big black biting critters into our tent. I highly recommend bug nets!

Finding the Perfect Campsite

Finding the Perfect Campsite

After setting up camp, we followed the trail to Cutthroat Lake. So beautiful!

Reflections in Cutthroat Lake

Reflections in Cutthroat Lake

Here’s a great shot of Kent, the camp cook, in action. He’s preparing a high-protein, quick-cooking pasta with carrots and broccoli (that we dehydrated ourselves) and tuna. We recently took a backcountry cooking class at our local REI (see: REI – Bellingham – Events) and, while none of the recipes they shared or any of the pre-packaged, dehydrated foods they used as samples in the class sounded remotely like anything that we would want to eat, we were greatly inspired to branch out more and become more creative with our backpacking meals. We now dehydrate our own coleslaw and mix it with rehydrated lentils and/or beans to roll in a high-protein tortilla for lunch, we add packets of cream cheese to our pasta dishes, and we dehydrate lots more vegetables (carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.) to mix in with pasta or potato dishes. We even make a extremely delicious and hearty vegetable soup for dinner. We are eating very well out on the trail now while still managing to keep the weight of the food in our packs down to a minimum.

Camp cook . . . Kent Doughty

Camp cook . . . Kent Doughty

The next day we had a marvelous time hiking to Cutthroat Pass (more on that hike here – https://60before60.wordpress.com/2013/07/12/53-cutthroat-pass/), then upon our return to camp, we packed up and hiked back to the trailhead and headed back home.

Backpacking out . . . back to the trailhead

Backpacking out . . . back to the trailhead

For more information on the hike to Cutthroat Lake, go here – http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/cutthroat-lake.

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Categories: Hiking, Nature, Okanogan County, Photography, Whatcom County | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

146 – Waterfront Renaissance Walk & Esther Short Park

Mixing more business with pleasure, this time we spent an afternoon and evening along Vancouver, WA’s Waterfront Renaissance Walk and exploring the Esther Short Park. The walk follows the shore of the Columbia River on the Washington side with great views of Portland, Oregon on the other. That’s the bridge over the Columbia River as our backdrop.

102 Waterfront Park River Walk (2)

It’s a beautiful walk!

Waterfront Renaissance Walk, Vancouver, WA

Waterfront Renaissance Walk, Vancouver, WA

I have an appreciation of the mid-century style as is quite obvious if you saw my living room. Here’s a sneak peak for those of you that haven’t stopped by our condo.

Living Room - Mid-Century Accents

Living Room – Mid-Century Accents

So it’s probably no surprise that I would also admire this mid-century gem, the Smith Tower Apartments, in the skyline while exploring downtown Vancouver. Wouldn’t our decor fit absolutely splendidly in such a building?

Smith Tower Apartments, Vancouver, WA's mid-century gem

Smith Tower Apartments, Vancouver, WA’s mid-century gem

Next we explored the Esther Short Park in downtown Vancouver. It being high summer, their rose garden was absolutely stunning.

Rose Garden at the Esther Short Park

Rose Garden at the Esther Short Park

Here’s the somewhat famous Clock Tower that stands in the park, with the Smith Tower Apartments in view a few blocks behind.

Clock Tower in Esther Short Park, Vancouver, WA

Clock Tower in Esther Short Park, Vancouver, WA

Meanwhile, we really were in Vancouver on business, so even though we managed to fit in several miles of trails exploring a few of the local parks, Kent had places to go and people to see.

Kent Doughty . . . Places to Go, People to See

Kent Doughty . . . Places to Go, People to See

Go here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver,_Washington – for information about the town of Vancouver, WA; here – http://www.cityofvancouver.us/parksrec/page/waterfront-renaissance-trail-5-miles – for information about the Waterfront Renaissance Walk, and here – http://www.cityofvancouver.us/parksrec/page/esther-short-park-0 – for information about the Esther Short Park.

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Categories: Hiking, Nature, Photography | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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