159 – Backpacking the Enchantments – On to Ida Creek

If you’ve been following the blog posts about our backpacking trip into the Enchantments area of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, you already know that it was not the fact that the Government was in the middle of its 2013 shutdown that kept us from entering the inner core of the Enchantments but an early snowfall with lingering cold temperatures that caused a buildup of ice on the rebar steps over giant granite slabs that prevented us from going any further than the Lower and Upper Snow Lakes. If you missed that story, go here –https://60before60.wordpress.com/2013/10/04/63-snow-lakes/ – and you’ll be caught up in a flash. Meanwhile, we had the week off and enough food and gear with us for that week, so what did we do? We packed up and decided to move on.

4,000' Up - 4,000' Down
4,000′ Up – 4,000′ Down

Enjoying the views along the trail as we make our way back down to the trailhead.

Along the trail . . .
Along the trail . . .

And it was like any other day on the trail – absolutely beautiful!

The view . . . from the trail
The view . . . from the trail

Having fun along the trail . . .

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Along the trail
(pic by Kenton Doughty) Along the trail

The fall colors in the thick understory were a welcome treat to the eyes as we entered a lower elevation forest previously lost to a forest fire.

All ong the trail
All ong the trail

Even though the Government shutdown was still in progress and all Government campgrounds were closed, as it turned out, the management of some of the campgrounds in the National Forests is contracted out to private companies, so there were several in the Leavenworth area that were open for business. Car camping this time rather than backpacking, here’s our campsite at Ida Creek.

Fall colors at our camp
Fall colors at our camp

As usual, we find beautiful places to eat.

Dining on the beach at camp
Dining on the beach at camp

The Ida Creek Campground is in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest near Leavenworth, WA. Go here – http://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/okawen/recreation/camping-cabins/recarea/?recid=58815&actid=31 – for more information on this campgrounds. Keep them in mind if you ever find yourself looking for a campground in the National Forest in the Leavenworth area and the Government is in the middle of a shutdown. It’s a beauty!

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157 – Backpacking the Enchantments – Snow Lakes Trail to Nada Lake

Right up until the moment that we put on our backpacks in the parking lot by the trailhead, we felt fortunate to be able to go on this particular backpacking trip, yet not quite sure that we could do it.  First off, the Enchantments area of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest is a very unique and fragile environment. To protect it, the U.S. Forest Service limits the number of backpackers allowed into the area at any given time by holding an annual lottery for permits. In order to obtain our permit, we submitted our application last February indicating the dates we desired, and did not find out until March if our permit was accepted. Also, at just over 4,000′ elevation gain over the six miles from the trailhead to where our permit allowed us to camp our first night out, this was the steepest and longest backpacking trip we had ever done. Our backpacks were heavier than usual as it had snowed the night before and weather forecasts predicted the temperature to drop to 27 degrees our first night out. We carried extra layers of warm clothes and more food than we usually packed for a week in the backcountry. We left the parking lot prepared for the snow that had already fallen and the low temperatures, planning on a tough day of hiking. Because the trailhead is about a four-hour drive from our home, the night before we headed to son Brian’s home as he lives just under an hour’s drive from the trail so we could begin our hike as early as possible. Here Maybee, Brian’s trusty dog, bids us her good-bye as we head out the door.

Kent Doughty saying goodbye to Maybee the Dog
Kent Doughty saying goodbye to Maybee the Dog

Then, it just so happened that the 2013 Government shutdown began the day before the date of our permitted trip, and with all National Parks closed, we didn’t even know for sure if we would be allowed on the trail. It wasn’t like we could simply call the parks office and ask them because, after all, their offices were closed and all unessential employees had been furloughed. We had stopped at the parks office in Leavenworth on our way to Brian’s the night before, and discovered a note taped to their window indicating that if people had printed out their permits, they should leave them on the dashboard of their vehicles and go on their trip. The Government websites had all been taken off-line a few days before, so if you had not printed your permit before the Government shutdown, it sounded like it was just too bad. Fortunately, we had printed our permit the weekend before we left home!

Foggy at the trailhead parking lot
Foggy at the trailhead parking lot

It had snowed the day before at the higher elevations, and because of the Government shutdown, getting accurate weather information and current snow levels and trail conditions was impossible, unless you ran into someone in the parking lot or something that had just come out of the area. We were lucky, and found a guy that had spent the night in his van because some of the campgrounds were also closed due to the Government shutdown when we arrived at the trailhead early that morning. He told us that he had been on a different trail near the area that was at about the same elevation and that in some places he had found himself plowing through shoulder high snow. He had also heard that Aasgard Pass was closed due to there being three-foot drifts of snow. Aasgard Pass is another, even steeper but shorter, way of entering the Enchantments – but seriously, if you know me at all, you would pretty much figure that any pass with a name that sounds even remotely like “Aasgard” (regardless of how it might be spelled!) is a route that I would avoid, and we had planned our route along the Snow Lakes Trail and planned to camp at Nada Lake the first night. We headed out from the trailhead expecting to run into snow at higher elevations near Nada Lake, and set off ready for a long, steep day of hiking.

With Kent Doughty at the trailhead
With Kent Doughty at the trailhead

First off, we crossed Icicle Creek.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose crossing Icicle Creek
(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose crossing Icicle Creek

Then the trail started to climb. One switchback after another, up, up, up we hiked. By then, the fog had cleared and it was a beautiful blue-sky kind of day.

It's a steep trail with lots of switchbacks
It’s a steep trail with lots of switchbacks

We had lots of talus slopes to cross. Long, steep talus slopes, so were forever glad that they were not covered with ice and snow.

There were plenty of talus slope trails
There were plenty of talus slope trails

Four thousand feet of elevation gain over six miles of trail makes for a long hike – especially considering that for this trip, my pack weighed in at somewhere over forty pounds. Whew, I needed a little break here before continuing on.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Taking a break on the climb up
(pic by Kenton Doughty) Taking a break on the climb up

The views were beautiful along the trail. Great views always seem to make it a little easier for me – especially on long, steep trails. I think this is a view of the famous Aasgard Pass. Just look at all that fresh snow! I couldn’t imagine my climbing that one with this pack!

View from the trail
View from the trail

After awhile, we had gained enough elevation that we started hitting snow and ice on those talus slopes. Fortunately, I had brought my trekking pole and had ice trekkers handy in my pack if the going got slippery.

Snow and ice on the talus trail
Snow and ice on the talus trail

Yep, before long, the trail was completely covered with snow, and it was cold. Time to pull out the neck gator, hat and warm gloves.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Snow at higher elevations along the trail
(pic by Kenton Doughty) Snow at higher elevations along the trail

Finally! We reached Nada Lake and found a spot that was relatively snow free in which to set up camp.

Setting up camp at Nada Lake
Setting up camp at Nada Lake

Not a bad view of Nada Lake from camp as we sipped hot chocolate and ate a vegetable soup for dinner.

Nada Lake from Camp
Nada Lake from Camp

For more information on obtaining a permit to hike into the Enchantments and the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, go here –   http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/okawen/passes-permits/recreation/?cid=fsbdev3_053607 . Stay tuned, we were here for a week, and had some great day hikes – and more!

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160 – Eight Mile Lakes

Car camping at the Ida Creek Campgrounds (go here – Car Camping at Ida Creek Campgrounds – to read about that) in the Leavenworth area after our backpacking trip into the Enchantments (go here – Backpacking the Enchantments – to read more about our Enchantments trip) so we could enjoy another day of hiking before making the long drive home, Eight Mile Lakes was our destination. Getting there was an easy drive up a well-maintained gravel road. The morning sun lighting the fall colors along the way was a special treat!

Driving to the trailhead
Driving to the trailhead

Ready to make the 6.6 mile hike up another trail, we paused long enough at the trailhead to snap this photo.

Trailhead
Trailhead

The trail made a steady climb and often we passed through open areas with impressive looking pines.

Passing tall pines . . . along the trail
Passing tall pines . . . along the trail

We stopped to refill our hydration units with fresh water from Eight Mile Creek.

Purifying water from Eight Mile Creek
Purifying water from Eight Mile Creek

We passed some impressively sized boulders along the way.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose along the trail
(pic by Kenton Doughty) Rose along the trail

And crossed a few streams.

(pic by Kenton Doughty) Stream crossing
(pic by Kenton Doughty) Stream crossing

Reaching the first of the two Eight Mile Lakes, called Little Eight Mile Lake, we continued around this lake to make the final climb to the upper Eight Mile Lake.

Little Eight Mile Lake
Little Eight Mile Lake

The last stretch was steep and took us through an area recently burned by forest fire.

Climbing to reach the next Eight Mile Lake
Climbing to reach the next Eight Mile Lake

It seemed worth our effort to make the climb to Big Eight Mile Lake as it was truly a beauty. We stopped for a picnic lunch on the shore and basked in the afternoon sunshine before turning around and heading back to the trailhead.

Big Eight Milie Lake
Big Eight Milie Lake

It had been a long hike with approximately 1,300′ of elevation gain, so Snickers bars made the perfect high-energy quick snack to help us power back down to the parking lot.

Time for a power snack - Snickers
Time for a power snack – Snickers

For more information and recent trip reports for the hike to Eight Mile Lakes on the Washington Trails Association website, go here –http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/eightmile-lake.

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158 – Snow Lakes

Camping near Nada Lake during our backpacking trip into the Enchantments area of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness (go here – https://60before60.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/62-backpacking-the-enchantments-snow-lakes-trail-to-nada-lake/ – to read about our hike to Nada Lake), isn’t this quite the view to enjoy while sipping the morning cup of coffee? With a view like this, it was almost easy to disregard the fact that even though the sun was shining, it was only 27 degrees F and our little tent had frost on top of its rainfly. We knew it was going to be cold during the night the day before when we packed in, so came prepared with plenty of warm layers of polar fleece clothing. I had even brought a few of those packets of Hot Hands hand warmers and tossed a couple into the bottom of my sleeping bag before turning in for the night. I slept very comfortably, and was glad I had warm feet.

Morning coffee at Nada Lake
Morning coffee at Nada Lake

Not long after we had finished our morning coffee and breakfast, we began to see more hikers heading in, and others packing out. The weather forecast had indicated that the conditions would be improving after that first day of snow and cold, and it appeared that even though the Government was in the middle of a shut down, word was getting out that the Alpine Lakes Wilderness was not one of those Government areas that was closed. This was a National wilderness area, and while the toilet building at the trailhead was padlocked and had a sign on its door that it was closed due to the Government shutdown, the parking lot at the trailhead was open, there were no barricades anywhere, there were no armed guards like some people were saying were guarding some of the National Parks and Monuments, and this Wilderness was open for business.

Hikers along Nada Lake
Hikers along Nada Lake

Some of the hikers stopped by our camp as they passed by Nada Lake to take a short break and enjoy the view and shared with us what they knew about the trail conditions near Snow Lakes. The two Snow Lakes were about 1,400′ higher in elevation than where we were at Nada Lake, and as we had feared, it was reported that the snow there was at least six to to eight inches deep. Some of the hikers were heading back down to the trailhead because snow and ice was built up to such a degree on the rebar steps on the huge granite slabs that must be crossed, making entry into the inner core area of Enchantments impossible. Our original plan was to pack up our camp after breakfast and move to one of the campsites at Lower Snow Lakes so we would be in a better position for day hikes into the inner core area, but the idea of camping on snow and not being able to go any further didn’t sound very appealing. Instead, we changed our plans and decided to simply keep our lovely campsite there at Nada Lake and day hike up and back to the Snow Lakes instead. Here’s a view looking back at Nada Lake as we started up the trail Snow Lakes.

High above Nada Lake
High above Nada Lake

This photo is from one of my favorite sections of the trail. As I mentioned before, the Snow Lakes are about 1,400′ higher in elevation than Nada Lake, so as we continued to climb along the trail, we continued to find more and more snow. This photo was taken about where it became necessary to put our ice trekkers on our boots for better traction along the ice covered talus. I particularly enjoyed this part of the trail as I stood next to this snow topped boulder. The snow its roof, it reminded me of a little house.

(Pic by Kenton Doughty) Snow on talus
(Pic by Kenton Doughty) Snow on talus

Because of the recent low temperatures, Upper Snow Lake was frozen over. Its water was so low, with a big bathtub ring, it seemed more like a puddle to me, and I was glad that we had kept our campsite down at Nada Lake. I felt we had the better reflective view for coffee and knew the temperature wasn’t as cold where we had camped, but how about that mountain peak behind Upper Snow lake? I thought it quite impressive!

Upper Snow Lake
Upper Snow Lake

We had brought a picnic lunch with us on this hike and sat on the shore of the Lower Snow Lake on a boulder warmed by the afternoon sun as we ate our lunch.

Picnic spot at Lower Snow Lake
Picnic spot at Lower Snow Lake

After lunch we explored around the two Snow Lakes a bit before making our way back down the snowy trail to our camp at Nada Lake.

Trekking back . . .
Trekking back . . .

Seems we often come to a stream with not quite a bridge over it when we are out hiking, and this trail was no exception. Here, Kent Doughty offers me his hand as I step down to the log that has become this stream crossing yet  is nearly completely submerged. Thank you sweetheart!

Kent Doughty offers me a hand when crossing the stream
Kent Doughty offers me a hand when crossing the stream

More information about the trail to Snow Lakes can be found on the Washington Trails Association website here –http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/snow-lakes .

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